[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]The RJ Council does not endorse, support or otherwise recommend any particular training, trainer, curriculum or methodology. The RJ Council takes no responsibility for training providers or the quality or adherence to guidelines and standards in the content of their training. Some trainers are listed in the RJ Directory.
[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]After reviewing the Practices and Implementation portions of this Restorative Practices in Schools document, school personnel in partnership with Restorative Practices professionals should determine the specific goals, readiness and needs of the district or school requesting training. School leaders are encouraged to engage the support of experienced Restorative Practices in Schools practitioners, trainers and consultants who abide by the Restorative Justice Facilitator Code of Conduct and Standards of Training and Practice (http://www.rjcolorado.org/restorative-justice/colorado-standards-of-practice ) when developing Restorative Practices in their schools.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]Training should include learning objectives and be differentiated based on the current staff understanding of Restorative Practice in Schools. Practitioners/trainers are expected to be aware of their own biases and demonstrate cultural sensitivity in knowing their audience; having an awareness of the cultural shift that Restorative Practices create in the school community. Training participants are identified after considering the Implementation Plan document. In order to establish common training practices and language in Colorado schools, all aspects of this document should be utilized, with special emphasis on those areas of need and practice identified in planning and preparation by the practitioner and school personnel.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]

Basic Standards for Restorative Practices in Schools Trainers

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  1. Trainer is expected to abide by the Restorative Justice Facilitator Code of Conduct and Standards of Training and Practice ( http://www.rjcolorado.org/restorative- justice/colorado-standards-of-practice ).
  2. Trainers should work with the school leadership to design the training(s) based on the Principles and Practices sections of this document and an implementation plan based on the readiness assessment and goals of the school/district.
  3. Trainers should be able to demonstrate working knowledge of Restorative Practices in Schools and are responsible for maintaining their own professional development on evidence based and emerging
  4. Trainers should be experienced restorative practitioners able to demonstrate their skills and provide evidence of their work in schools and ongoing development as a practitioner.
  5. Trainers should ensure the time period for the training is sufficient to equip participants with the appropriate knowledge, skills and confidence to provide safe and quality restorative practice in schools.
  6. Trainers are encouraged to assist schools to develop sustainability through training for trainers model.
  7. Trainers should advise schools and provide support for setting up communities of practice and professional development opportunities.
  8. Following training, the trainers will give feedback to the school leadership on the progress of individual participant when there are concerns and provide recommendations for any further training needed. This arrangement should be organized and agreed before training commences.
  9. Trainers should provide a way for participants to evaluate the course and share that feedback with the client.
  10. Trainers will make themselves available to participants for feedback and advice where possible and appropriate and respond appropriately and restoratively to the feedback.
  11. Trainers in Restorative Practice should make references and evaluations from previous courses available to potential clients.
  12. Trainers are encouraged to assist schools to develop sustainability through training for trainers model.
  13. Trainers should advise schools to use and support setting up communities of practice and professional development opportunities beyond initial trainings. Trainers should provide a way for participants to evaluate the course and share that feedback with the client.
  14. Trainers will make themselves available to participants for feedback and advice where possible and appropriate.
  15. Trainers should hold forth the maxim, “do no harm”.

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Basic Standards for Restorative Practices in Schools Trainings

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]Depending on the level of training and engagement with Restorative Practices in Schools training participants should have:[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]

Foundational level:

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  • A working knowledge of restorative justice principles and values
  • A working knowledge of restorative justice philosophy and history
  • Basic communication/group facilitation skills (e.g. affective statements, active listening, open questions, tone of voice, body language, mutual respect, reframing, restorative language, group dynamics)
  • Equity, Diversity and Cultural Awareness (e.g .Bias awareness in race, ethnicity, mental health, (dis)ability, culture, size, language, socio-economics, sex, origin, sexual orientation, gender identity )
  • Behavior as communication
  • Distinction between Restorative Practices in Schools and Restorative Justice Practices in the Justice system
  • An understanding that all restorative justice practices should be voluntary and why

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Practitioner level:

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  • Demonstration of a good working knowledge of a restorative practices to be used (Informal – Formal)
  • Demonstration of the relative design or configuration of the participants in those models of Restorative Practices in Schools that the school will use
  • Basic knowledge of school response to behavior and discipline best and evidence-based practices and how restorative responses integrate with school policies
  • Recognition of trauma, crisis management and skill development to handle these circumstances in pre-conferencing or during a process and as may arise especially in Formal practices
  • Training for (Formal) facilitation skill development must include:
    • Demonstration restorative justice skills based on models the school-based practices will use
    • Practical applications and experiential activities, including role plays with school based scenarios
    • Every participant must be given the opportunity to practice and observe facilitation skills and receive feedback
    • Preparation for the conferencing model if it will be used (pre-conferencing)
    • Agreement writing- allowing harmed parties and responsible parties to create
    • Equity and Cultural sensitivity skills
    • Facilitation and Co-facilitation models
    • Understanding of participant roles
      • Harmed Parties
      • Persons Responsible for harm
      • School personnel
      • Peers
      • Law enforcement, Community and Support people (i.e. parents/guardians)
  • An understanding of and commitment to confidentiality within the law and guidelines of the school district
  • An understanding of the use of evaluations for program, process and self-improvement
  • Training should be delivered over a time period sufficient to equip participants with the appropriate knowledge, skills and confidence to provide safe and quality restorative practice in schools.
  • Training should be provided in a setting conducive to focused learning and
  • Training content may vary and should be designed based on implementation plan, readiness, varying levels of knowledge, skill and proficiency of participants. Although school-based practitioners should be able to verify knowledge and skills in the areas of practice noted above.
  • Every Restorative Practitioner in Schools training participant must be given the opportunity to practice and observe facilitation skills and receive feedback. (A 10:1, participant: trainer ratio is recommended) *Foundational training that is content focused may be done in large groups without the experiential component.
  • Initial facilitation training should be followed by direct mentorship from experienced practitioners with opportunities for observation, debriefing and feedback.
  • Following training, the trainers will give feedback to the client on the progress of individual participant when there are concerns and provide recommendations for any further training needed. This arrangement should be organized and agreed before training commences.

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